Sarah Nilsson, JD, PhD, MAS
Sarah Nilsson, JD, PhD, MAS

Test Prep 5 - Airspace

General airspace (UA.II.A.K1)

Air Safety Institute Interactive module: Know before you go

 

 

UAS_Airspacecardv2 Page 1.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [145.1 KB]
FAA_Airspacecard3.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [97.0 KB]

PDF of Airspace

VFRMAP

SkyVector

AIRMAP

 

Aeronautical Chart User's Guide - very handy if you encounter an unfamiliar symbol on the chart 

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

The two categories of airspace are: regulatory and nonregulatory. Within these two categories there are four types: controlled, uncontrolled, special use, and other airspace. Figure 14-1 presents a profile view of the dimensions of various classes of airspace. Also, there are excerpts from sectional charts which are discussed in Chapter 15, Navigation, that are used to illustrate how airspace is depicted.

 

Remote pilot sUAS study guide

The categories and types of airspace are dictated by the complexity or density of aircraft movements, nature of the operations conducted within the airspace, the level of safety required, and national and public interest.  

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Controlled airspace is a generic term that covers the different classifications of airspace and defined dimensions within which air traffic control (ATC) service is provided in accordance with the airspace classification.

Controlled airspace consists of:

- Class A

- Class B

- Class C

- Class D

- Class E

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Class A airspace is generally the airspace from 18,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) up to and including flight level (FL) 600, including the airspace overlying the waters within 12 nautical miles (NM) of the coast of the 48 contiguous states and Alaska. Unless otherwise authorized, all operation in Class A airspace is conducted under instrument flight rules (IFR).

 

Remote pilot sUAS study guide

Controlled airspace that is of concern to the remote pilot is:

- Class B

- Class C

- Class D

- Class E 

SA02_Airspace_for_Everyone.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [737.5 KB]

UA.II.A.K1a - Class B controlled airspace

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Class B airspace is generally airspace from the surface to 10,000 feet MSL surrounding the nation’s busiest airports in terms of airport operations or passenger enplanements. The configuration of each Class B airspace area is individually tailored, consists of a surface area and two or more layers (some Class B airspace areas resemble upside-down wedding cakes), and is designed to contain all published instrument procedures once an aircraft enters the airspace. An ATC clearance is required for all aircraft to operate in the area, and all aircraft that are so cleared receive separation services within the airspace.

 

Remote pilot sUAS study guide

A remote pilot must receive authorization from ATC before operating in the Class B airspace. 

UA.II.A.K1b - Class C controlled airspace

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Class C airspace is generally airspace from the surface to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL) surrounding those airports that have an operational control tower, are serviced by a radar approach control, and have a certain number of IFR operations or passenger enplanements. Although the configuration of each Class C area is individually tailored, the airspace usually consists of a surface area with a five NM radius, an outer circle with a ten NM radius that extends from 1,200 feet to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation, and an outer area. Each aircraft must establish two-way radio communications with the ATC facility providing air traffic services prior to entering the airspace and thereafter maintain those communications while within the airspace.

 

Remote pilot sUAS study guide

A remote pilot must receive authorization before operating in Class C airspace.

 

(Refer to FAA-CT-8080-2H, Figure 23, area 3.)

What is the floor of the Savannah Class C airspace at the shelf area (outer circle)?

  1. 1,300 feet AGL
  2. 1,300 feet MSL
  3. 1,700 feet MSL

 

According to 14 CFR Part 107 the remote pilot in command (PIC) of a small unmanned aircraft planning to operate within Class C airspace

  1. Must use a visual observer
  2. Is required to file a flight plan
  3. Is required to receive ATC authorization

 

According to 14 CFR Part 107, how may a remote pilot operate an unmanned aircraft in Class C airspace?

  1. The remote pilot must have prior authorization from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) facility having jurisdiction over that airspace
  2. The remote pilot must monitor the Air Traffic Control (ATC) frequency from launch to recovery
  3. The remote pilot must contact the Air Traffic Control (ATC) facility after launching the unmanned aircraft

UA.II.A.K1c - Class D controlled airspace

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Class D airspace is generally airspace from the surface to 2,500 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL) surrounding those airports that have an operational control tower. The configuration of each Class D airspace area is individually tailored and when instrument procedures are published, the airspace is normally designed to contain the procedures. Arrival extensions for instrument approach procedures (IAPs) may be Class D or Class E airspace. Unless otherwise authorized, each aircraft must establish two-way radio communications with the ATC facility providing air traffic services prior to entering the airspace and thereafter maintain those communications while in the airspace.

 

Remote pilot sUAS study guide

A remote pilot must receive ATC authorization before operating in Class D airspace. 

UA.II.A.K1d - Class E controlled airspace

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

If the airspace is not Class A, B, C, or D, and is controlled airspace, then it is Class E airspace. Class E airspace extends upward from either the surface or a designated altitude to the overlying or adjacent controlled airspace. When designated as a surface area, the airspace is configured to contain all instrument procedures. Also in this class are federal airways, airspace beginning at either 700 or 1,200 feet above ground level (AGL) used to transition to and from the terminal or en route environment, and en route domestic and offshore airspace areas designated below 18,000 feet MSL. Unless designated at a lower altitude, Class E airspace begins at 14,500 MSL over the United States, including that airspace overlying the waters within 12 NM of the coast of the 48 contiguous states and Alaska, up to but not including 18,000 feet MSL, and the airspace above FL 600.

 

Remote pilot sUAS study guide

In most cases, a remote pilot will not need ATC authorization to operate in Class E airspace. 

UA.II.A.K1e - Class G uncontrolled airspace

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Uncontrolled airspace or Class G airspace is the portion of the airspace that has not been designated as Class A, B, C, D, or E. It is therefore designated uncontrolled airspace. Class G airspace extends from the surface to the base of the overlying Class E airspace. Although ATC has no authority or responsibility to control air traffic, pilots should remember there are visual flight rules (VFR) minimums which apply to Class G airspace.

 

Remote pilot sUAS study guide

A remote pilot will not need ATC authorization to operate in Class G airspace. 

 

Courtesy of Greg Reverdiau and AZDrone here is a 3-D model to help you learn more

 

UA.II.A.K2 - Special-use airspace, such as prohibited, restricted, warning areas, military operation areas, alert areas, and controlled firing areas

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Special use airspace or special area of operation (SAO) is the designation for airspace in which certain activities must be confined, or where limitations may be imposed on aircraft operations that are not part of those activities. Certain special use airspace areas can create limitations on the mixed use of airspace. The special use airspace depicted on instrument charts includes the area name or number, effective altitude, time and weather conditions of operation, the controlling agency, and the chart panel location. On National Aeronautical Charting Group (NACG) en route charts, this information is available on one of the end panels.

Special use airspace usually consists of:

- Prohibited areas

- Restricted areas

- Warning areas

- Military Operation Areas (MOAs)

- Alert areas

- Controlled firing areas (CFAs)

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Prohibited areas contain airspace of defined dimensions within which the flight of aircraft is prohibited. Such areas are established for security or other reasons associated with the national welfare. These areas are published in the Federal Register and are depicted on aeronautical charts. The area is charted as a “P” followed by a number (e.g., P-49). Examples of prohibited areas include Camp David and the National Mall in Washington, D.C., where the White House and the Congressional buildings are located.

 

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Restricted areas are areas where operations are hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft and contain airspace within which the flight of aircraft, while not wholly prohibited, is subject to restrictions. Activities within these areas must be confined because of their nature, or limitations may be imposed upon aircraft operations that are not a part of those activities, or both. Restricted areas denote the existence of unusual, often invisible, hazards to aircraft (e.g., artillery firing, aerial gunnery, or guided missiles). IFR flights may be authorized to transit the airspace and are routed accordingly. Penetration of restricted areas without authorization from the using or controlling agency may be extremely hazardous to the aircraft and its occupants. ATC facilities apply the following procedures when aircraft are operating on an IFR clearance (including those cleared by ATC to maintain VFR on top) via a route which lies within joint-use restricted airspace:

  1. If the restricted area is not active and has been released to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the ATC facility allows the aircraft to operate in the restricted airspace without issuing specific clearance for it to do so.
  2. If the restricted area is active and has not been released to the FAA, the ATC facility issues a clearance which ensures the aircraft avoids the restricted airspace.

Restricted areas are charted with an “R” followed by a number (e.g., R-4401) and are depicted on the en route chart appropriate for use at the altitude or FL being flown. [Figure 14-3] Restricted area information can be obtained on the back of the chart.

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Warning areas are similar in nature to restricted areas; however, the United States government does not have sole jurisdiction over the airspace. A warning area is airspace of defined dimensions, extending from 3 NM outward from the coast of the United States, containing activity that may be hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft. The purpose of such areas is to warn nonparticipating pilots of the potential danger. A warning area may be located over domestic or international waters or both. The airspace is designated with a “W” followed by a number (e.g. W-237) [Figure 14-4]

 

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Military Operations Areas (MOAs) consist of airspace with defined vertical and lateral limits established for the purpose of separating certain military training activities from IFR traffic. Whenever an MOA is being used, nonparticipating IFR traffic may be cleared through an MOA if IFR separation can be provided by ATC. Otherwise, ATC reroutes or restricts nonparticipating IFR traffic. MOAs are depicted on sectional, VFR terminal area, and en route low altitude charts and are not numbered (e.g., “Camden Ridge MOA”). [Figure 14-5] However, the MOA is also further defined on the back of the sectional charts with times of operation, altitudes affected, and the controlling agency.

 

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Alert areas are depicted on aeronautical charts with an “A” followed by a number (e.g., A-211) to inform nonparticipating pilots of areas that may contain a high volume of pilot training or an unusual type of aerial activity. Pilots should exercise caution in alert areas. All activity within an alert area shall be conducted in accordance with regulations, without waiver, and pilots of participating aircraft, as well as pilots transiting the area, shall be equally responsible for collision avoidance. [Figure 14-6]

 

 

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Controlled Firing Areas (CFAs) contain activities, which, if not conducted in a controlled environment, could be hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft. The difference between CFAs and other special use airspace is that activities must be suspended when a spotter aircraft, radar, or ground lookout position indicates an aircraft might be approaching the area. There is no need to chart CFAs since they do not cause a nonparticipating aircraft to change its flightpath.

 

(Refer to FAA-CT-8080-2H, Figure 59, area 2.)

The chart shows a gray line with “VR1667, VR1617, VR1638, and VR1668.” Could this area present a hazard to the operations of a small UA?

  1. No, all operations will be above 400 feet
  2. Yes, this is a Military Training Route from the surface to 1,500 feet AGL
  3. Yes, the defined route provides traffic separation to manned aircraft

 

(Refer to FAA-CT-8080-2H, Figure 21.)

You have been hired by a farmer to use your small UA to inspect his crops. The area that you are to survey is in the Devil’s Lake West MOA, east of area 2. How would you find out if the MOA is active?

  1. Refer to the chart legend
  2. This information is available in the Small UAS Database
  3. Refer to the Military Operations Directory

 

 

 

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Sarah Nilsson, J.D., Ph.D., MAS

 

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